Ira David Wood III

Ira David Wood III


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Ira David Wood III studied at the North Carolina School of Arts. He is an award-winning director, actor and playwright and is currently the Executive Director of the Theatre in the Park in Raleigh, North Carolina.

Wood has researched the assassination of John F. Kennedy and contributed 22nd November 1963: A Chronology to Murder in Dealey Plaza (2000).


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On July 16, 1918, Nicholas Romanov, the last Tsar of Russia, and his entire family were supposedly murdered by Russian Bolsheviks in the basement of a house in Yekaterinburg, Siberia. One year later, Alexander Kolchak, the Supreme Commander of the White Army, appointed a legal investigator to prove, beyond any doubt, that all members of the Romanov family had indeed been executed. The investigator’s name was Nicholas Sokolov.

The Russian Galatea is a story based on Sokolov’s investigation. It takes place in Siberia, 1919 – with the Russian Revolution as its background. The major thesis is fiction but woven around true historical facts. It is a detective story about one courageous investigator’s obsession with finding out what really happened to Russian Tsar Nicholas II and his family. It is also a story about Sokolov’s deep relationship with the girl in a faded photograph. Is she alive or dead?


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Financial History Part III – History of IRA

Our look back into history will touch on the origin of retirement savings accounts which enjoy income tax advantages over ordinary savings vehicles such as savings accounts and taxable brokerage accounts. We’ll cover traditional IRA’s (individual retirement arrangements in IRS parlance) as well as SEP, SIMPLE and Roth IRA’s. Prior to the introduction of these tax-preferenced vehicles, retirement savers looking for a tax break were basically limited to insurance products. Permanent insurance, such as whole life has been around for centuries as well as various insurance annuity products. These vehicles have long enjoyed the postponement of income taxes on the buildup of cash value within the policy. However, their use was hampered by high internal expenses and the compromises associated with trying to use the same product to accomplish two goals (death benefit + retirement savings).

IRA’s were an outgrowth of the Employee Retirement Income Security Act (ERISA) of 1974. Congress was spurred to action by the collapse of the Studebaker Motors pension plan and enacted a great many provisions to give workers greater protections and opportunities to build retirement security. Traditional IRA’s became available in 1975 and allowed income taxes on the growth of the account to be deferred until withdrawal, ideally in retirement. The original contribution limit was $1,500 or 15% of wages/salary/tips reported on Form 1040 and when enacted, did not allow for a tax deduction on contributions. In its early years, the IRA was only available through banks, but by the 1980’s nearly every type of financial services firm was offering these accounts. The Economic Recovery Act of 1981 increased the annual contribution limits to $2,000 or 100% of earned income and allowed contributions to be tax deductible. This limit was to remain at this level until 2001.

Congress sensed they had given us too good of a deal and in 1986, conditioned the automatic tax deductibility of contributions. The Tax Reform Act of 1986 introduced income limits which curtailed the tax deductibility for wage earners above a certain amount who were covered by an employer sponsored retirement plan such as a 401k. However, they did somewhat offset this pain by introducing spousal IRA’s which allowed a non-working spouse to fund an IRA based on their working spouse’s earned income.

Along the way, other variations of the traditional IRA were introduced to help small employers offer retirement plans in lieu of the more expensive workplace plans like 401k/403b/457’s. The 1978 Revenue Act facilitated Simplified Employee Pension (SEP) IRA’s which permitted employers to contribute to IRA’s opened for qualifying employees. The 1996 Small Business Job Protection Act introduced the Savings Incentive Match Plan for Employees or SIMPLE IRA which allows for both employee contributions and employer match contributions to employee owned accounts.

The Tax Payer Relief Act of 1997 ushered in a new type of IRA which was named after Senator William Roth of Delaware who championed the concept. Subject to income limitations, an employee could now choose to fund a traditional IRA which grows tax deferred or a non-deductible Roth IRA where qualifying withdrawals would never be taxed again. In addition, Roth IRA’s would not be subject to the Required Minimum Distribution (RMD) rules for IRA owners over 70 ½ years old. (recently increased to 72 years of age). Further, restrictions on some withdrawals from Roth IRA’s prior to age 59 ½ would be less painful for those in need of their money.

As mentioned previously, contribution limits for IRA’s were locked at $2,000 annually despite the corrosive effects of inflation. This changed with the Economic Growth and Tax Relief Reconciliation Act (EGTRRA) in 2001. With this legislation, Congress began a process of increasing the IRA contribution limits and they are now linked to inflation. For 2020, the limit is $6,000. In addition, EGTRRA introduced the possibility of “catch-up contributions” for workers over the age of 50. At present, the catchup amount is $1,000.

IRA’s have continued to evolve and Congress has continued to make changes, The Pension Protection Act of 2006 introduced the possibility of charitable giving (QCD) from an IRA for taxpayers over age 70 ½. This bill also provided for the Savers Tax Credit which in essence, subsidizes IRA contributions for lower income individuals. Rules related to Roth conversions and recharacterizations have changed several times. Most recently, the Setting Every Community Up for Retirement Enhancement (SECURE) Act increased the RMD age to 72 but also eliminated a popular tax-saving estate strategy known as the “stretch IRA” for non-spousal beneficiaries.

Traditional and Roth IRA’s have become a vital portion of our nation’s collective retirement readiness. According to the Investment Company Institute (ICI), the combined assets held in IRA’s reached $9.4 trillion as of March 31, 2019. Most of these monies arrived in these accounts via rollovers from employer sponsored plans like 401k’s and 403b’s. This often takes place when individuals change jobs. Unfortunately, these account holders often fail to take advantage of annual opportunities to grow these accounts by making additional contributions. As noted earlier, the contribution limits for IRA’s have been legislatively increased by more than threefold since the IRA first came into existence.

If you would like to have more information regarding Traditional IRA’s, Roth IRA’s, SEP’s, SIMPLE IRA’s or rollovers please contact us through our Level 5 Financial website or via phone at 719-323-1240.


Make a trip

One of David&aposs most beloved productions is his original comedy version of A Christmas Carol. A holiday tradition in Raleigh since 1974, Wood has had the honor of playing Scrooge since its inception more than 40 years ago. His son is now in the wings, warming up to take on the role. Wood says that many who return to see the play each year tell him it&aposs just like coming back to see an old friend. Experience the tradition for yourself, and also look out for comedies, contemporary dramas, musicals, original works, Shakespeare and more throughout the year.

Note: In a normal year, sold-out audiences would pack Memorial Auditorium in downtown Raleigh to take part in this time-honored holiday tradition. Due to COVID-19, that can&apost happen in 2020. Instead, Theatre In The Park is offering a recorded version of the hilarious 2019 performance for on-demand streaming purchase. So gather your family, prepare your popcornਊnd safely enjoy one of the most iconic holiday theatre productions in America.
 


David Wood (philosopher)

He has been a visiting tutorial at Berkeley, Yale and Stony Brook, and has taught at Duquesne and Turin. He is an honorary Professor of Philosophy at Warwick the place he ran a analysis seminar (Fatal Projections: Pathologies of Alterity) in Spring 2006.

He was subsequently employed by the University of Warwick, the place he went on to turn into chair of the philosophy division and director of the Centre for Research in Philosophy and Literature. In 1974 he studied in Paris, and attended lectures by Claude Lévi-Strauss, Michel Foucault, Jacques Derrida, Paul Ricoeur and Michel Serres. He left Warwick for Vanderbilt in 1994, the place he turned chair in 1995.

Wood was born in Oxford, England. He was an undergraduate on the University of Manchester, the place he was launched to phenomenology by Wolfe Mays. He went on to do graduate work in philosophy at New College, Oxford (1968–1971), the place by way of the nice places of work of Alan Montefiore (at Balliol College) Jacques Derrida was a frequent customer. Under the affect of a bunch of animal rights activists led by Roslind and Stanley Godlovitch – now often known as the Oxford Group Peter Singer, creator of Animal Liberation (1975) was related to them – he turned a vegetarian and began Ecology Action, a short-lived environmental group. [1]

Wood has taught philosophy in Europe and the United States for over thirty years, and is the creator of 16 books. In addition to educating at Vanderbilt University, he additionally co-directs (with Beth Conklin) a analysis programme in ecology and spirituality for the Centre for the Study of Religion and Culture.

David Wood (born 1946) is Centennial Professor of Philosophy, and Joe B. Wyatt Distinguished University Professor, at Vanderbilt University.


Ira David Wood III: The Art of Living Well

Ira David Wood III may be best known for his role as Ebenezer Scrooge in Theatre in the Park’s production of “A Christmas Carol,” but he’s anything but selfish in real life. For 45 years now, Wood has sacrificed much of his holiday time to direct, rehearse and perform in the show in Raleigh and Durham. Wood will tell you, however, that he is being selfish, because to him, he says, performing on stage is one of the most thrilling feelings in the world.

Wood came to the role of Scrooge after serving as North Carolina’s first theatre arts consultant, a job he took after declining an invitation from Andy Griffith to play a role in “The Andy Griffith Show” because of the debt he felt he owed to his home state. Wood, who grew up in Halifax County, thanks North Carolina for offering him a way out of the agriculture industry, giving him the resources he needed to get into the Governor’s School—a publicly funded residential summer program for gifted students—and then into the North Carolina School of the Arts in Winston-Salem.

After successfully directing a production for the Raleigh Children’s Theatre in the early 1970s, Wood was selected to be the theater’s executive director. It was during that time that he changed the institution’s name to Theatre in the Park in order to broaden the scope of the theatre and to attract people of all ages to get involved. In 1974, while most Raleigh theaters were closed during the holiday season, Wood opened Theatre in the Park’s doors to encourage families spending time together around Christmas to come out and see “A Christmas Carol.”

“It’s an honor to have people make us part of their celebration of the holidays,” Wood says.

Wood says he’s learned a lot from playing Scrooge for so long, namely about the spirit of giving and the message of the story, which, according to him, is “that we’re capable of transforming ourselves and becoming better than we were.”

“[Scrooge] has certainly made me better,” Wood continues. “At this point, it’s like meeting an old friend when I go into the dressing room.”

At 72, Wood is gearing up for retirement. On the 50th anniversary of A Christmas Carol, he will pass Scrooge’s signature tights and top hat on to his son, Ira David Wood IV, who has been alternating in the role with his father ever since Wood underwent open heart surgery in 2010. “Nobody wants to see a 72-year-old man in tights running around the stage,” Wood says with a laugh. “It’s time for me to hang them up.” Wood will continue to direct the production as long as his health allows, and son Ira, along with his daughter, the actress Evan Rachel Wood, say they plan to see to it that the show outlasts him. “That’s a very humbling thing to think, that you’ve created something that will outlive you and will continue to touch hearts and change lives.”

Wood says getting older has also given him a meaningful perspective on life in general. “Life is so short in the scheme of things and it’s so important, not just to live, but to celebrate moments,” Wood says. He says he’s learned to celebrate the fellow actors he’s worked with in “A Christmas Carol” and all the memories they’ve made, the simple pleasures that come with Christmastime and the happiness that theatre has brought him. Most of all, Wood says he hopes the production has brought joy to everyone who’s come to see it over the last 45 years, and that it will continue to bring joy to those who see it in the future when he’s no longer on stage playing Scrooge.

“We encourage people to laugh, to celebrate being together and to enjoy those tender moments,” says Wood. “And when you walk out, you’re better equipped to celebrate the holidays you’re a better person than you were when you walked in.”


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Ira David Wood III American Actor

Ira David Wood III was previously married to Sara Wood (1984 - 2002) .

About

Ira David Wood III is a 71 year old American Actor born on 19th November, 1949 in Rocky Mount, North Carolina, United States. His zodiac sign is Scorpio

Ira David Wood III is a member of the following lists: American musical theatre actors, 1947 births and 1949 births.

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Relationship Statistics

TypeTotalLongestAverageShortest
Married2 20 years, 7 months 19 years, 11 months 19 years, 4 months
Total2 20 years, 7 months 19 years, 11 months 19 years, 4 months

Details

First Name Ira
Middle Name David Wood
Last Name II
Age 71 years
Birthday 19th November, 1949
Birthplace Rocky Mount, North Carolina, United States
Build Large
Eye Color Brown - Dark
Hair Color Salt and Pepper
Zodiac Sign Scorpio
Sexuality Straight
Ethnicity White
Nationality American
Occupation Text Actor, director
Occupation Actor

Ira David Wood III (born November 19, 1947) is an American actor, author, singer, theater director and playwright. He is the Executive Director of Theatre in the Park, a community theatre company in Raleigh, North Carolina.


The Man in Tights

Ira David Wood III may be best known for his role as Ebenezer Scrooge in Theatre in the Park’s production of “A Christmas Carol,” but he’s anything but selfish in real life. For 45 years now, Wood has sacrificed much of his holiday time to direct, rehearse and perform in the show in Raleigh and Durham. Wood will tell you, however, that he is being selfish, because to him, he says, performing on stage is one of the most thrilling feelings in the world.

Wood came to the role of Scrooge after serving as North Carolina’s first theatre arts consultant, a job he took after declining an invitation from Andy Griffith to play a role in “The Andy Griffith Show” because of the debt he felt he owed to his home state. Wood, who grew up in Halifax County, thanks North Carolina for offering him a way out of the agriculture industry, giving him the resources he needed to get into the Governor’s School—a publicly funded residential summer program for gifted students—and then into the North Carolina School of the Arts in Winston-Salem.

After successfully directing a production for the Raleigh Children’s Theatre in the early 1970s, Wood was selected to be the theater’s executive director. It was during that time that he changed the institution’s name to Theatre in the Park in order to broaden the scope of the theatre and to attract people of all ages to get involved. In 1974, while most Raleigh theaters were closed during the holiday season, Wood opened Theatre in the Park’s doors to encourage families spending time together around Christmas to come out and see “A Christmas Carol.”

“It’s an honor to have people make us part of their celebration of the holidays,” Wood says.

Ira David Wood III

Wood says he’s learned a lot from playing Scrooge for so long, namely about the spirit of giving and the message of the story, which, according to him, is “that we’re capable of transforming ourselves and becoming better than we were.”

“[Scrooge] has certainly made me better,” Wood continues. “At this point, it’s like meeting an old friend when I go into the dressing room.”

At 72, Wood is gearing up for retirement. On the 50th anniversary of A Christmas Carol, he will pass Scrooge’s signature tights and top hat on to his son, Ira David Wood IV, who has been alternating in the role with his father ever since Wood underwent open heart surgery in 2010. “Nobody wants to see a 72-year-old man in tights running around the stage,” Wood says with a laugh. “It’s time for me to hang them up.” Wood will continue to direct the production as long as his health allows, and son Ira, along with his daughter, the actress Evan Rachel Wood, say they plan to see to it that the show outlasts him. “That’s a very humbling thing to think, that you’ve created something that will outlive you and will continue to touch hearts and change lives.”

Wood says getting older has also given him a meaningful perspective on life in general. “Life is so short in the scheme of things and it’s so important, not just to live, but to celebrate moments,” Wood says. He says he’s learned to celebrate the fellow actors he’s worked with in “A Christmas Carol” and all the memories they’ve made, the simple pleasures that come with Christmastime and the happiness that theatre has brought him. Most of all, Wood says he hopes the production has brought joy to everyone who’s come to see it over the last 45 years, and that it will continue to bring joy to those who see it in the future when he’s no longer on stage playing Scrooge.

“We encourage people to laugh, to celebrate being together and to enjoy those tender moments,” says Wood. “And when you walk out, you’re better equipped to celebrate the holidays you’re a better person than you were when you walked in.”


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